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Financial Terms beginning with E

E Meeting
E Micro Forex Futures
E Mini
E. Linn Draper Jr.
E
EAFE Index
EAGLES
EBITA
Earnings before interest, taxes, and amortization refers to a company's earnings before the deduction of interest, taxes and amortization expenses. It is a financial indicator used widely as a measure of efficiency and profitability.
EBITDA Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization
EBITDA Margin
EBITDA To Fixed Charges
EBITDA To Interest Coverage Ratio
EBITDA to sales ratio
EBITDA
A company's earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization is computed by considering a company's earnings before interest payments, tax, depreciation, and amortization are subtracted for any final accounting of its income and expenses. The EBITDA of a business gives an indication of its current operational profitability, i.e., how much profit it makes with its present assets and its operations on the products it produces and sells.
EBITDARM
ECB Announcement
ECN Broker
EPS Earnings Per Share
ETF Exchange Traded Fund
Each Way
An each-way bet is a wager offered by bookmakers consisting of two separate bets: a win bet and a place bet. For the win part of the bet to give a return, the selection must win, or finish first, in the event. For the place part of the bet to give a return, the selection must either win or finish in one of the predetermined places for the event, such as first place or second place. The odds paid on the place part of the bet are usually a fraction of the win odds. The trade-off being that one has a greater chance of making one's bet in trade for getting less payoff for doing so. Examples are domestic football knockout competitions where the quoted place terms may be.
Early Adopter
An early adopter or lighthouse customer is an early customer of a given company, product, or technology; in politics, fashion, art, and other fields, this person would be referred to as a trendsetter. The term originates from Everett M. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations.
Early Amortization
Early Exercise
Early Majority
Early Withdrawal
Earmarking
Earned Income Credit (EIC)
Earned Income
Earned Premium
Earnest Money
An earnest payment is a specific form of security deposit made in some major transactions such as real estate dealings or required by some official Procurement processes to demonstrate that the applicant is serious and willing to demonstrate an earnest of good faith about wanting to complete the transaction.
Earning Assets
Earning Potential
Earning The Points
Earnings Allowance
Earnings Announcement
Earnings Before Interest, Depreciation, Amortization and Exploration (EBIDAX)
Earnings Before Interest, Depreciation And Amortization (EBIDA)
Earnings Before Interest, Tax, Amortization And Exceptional Items (EBITAE)
Earnings Before Interest, Tax and Depreciation (EBITD)
Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization, and Restructuring or Rent Costs (EBITDAR)
Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization And Special Losses (EBITDAL)
Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Depletion, Amortization and Exploration Expenses (EBITDAX)
Earnings Before Interest & Tax (EBIT)
Earnings Before Interest After Taxes (EBIAT)
Earnings Before Tax (EBT)
Earnings Call
An earnings call is a teleconference, or increasingly a webcast, in which a public company discusses the financial results of a reporting period via an 800 number and on the internet. The name comes from earnings per share, the bottom line number in the income statement divided by the number of shares outstanding. The U.S. based National Investor Relations Institute says that 92% of companies represented by their members conduct earnings calls and that virtually all of these are webcast. Transcripts of calls may be made available either by the company or a third party.
Earnings Credit Rate (ECR)
Earnings Estimate
Earnings Management
Earnings management, in accounting, is the act of intentionally influencing the process of financial reporting to obtain some private gain. Earnings management involves the alteration of financial reports to mislead stakeholders about the organization's underlying performance, or to "influence contractual outcomes that depend on reported accounting numbers."
Earnings Momentum
Earnings Multiplier
Earnings Per Share (EPS)
Earnings Power Value (EPV)
Earnings Power
Earnings Recast
Earnings Season
Earnings Surprise
An earnings surprise, or unexpected earnings, in accounting, is the difference between the reported earnings and the expected earnings of an entity. Measures of a firm's expected earnings, in turn, include analysts' forecasts of the firm's profit and mathematical models of expected earnings based on the earnings of previous accounting periods.
Earnings Yield
Earnings yield is the quotient of earnings per share divided by the share price. It is the reciprocal of the P/E ratio.
Earnings
Earnings are the net benefits of a corporation's operation. Earnings is also the amount on which corporate tax is due. For an analysis of specific aspects of corporate operations several more specific terms are used as EBIT -- earnings before interest and taxes, EBITDA - earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization.
Earnout
Earnout refers to a pricing structure in mergers and acquisitions where the sellers must "earn" part of the purchase price based on the performance of the business following the acquisition.
Ease Of Movement
Ease of movement is an indicator used in technical analysis to relate an asset's price change to its volume. Ease of Movement was developed by Richard W. Arms, Jr. and highlights the relationship between volume and price changes and is particularly useful for assessing the strength of a trend. High positive values indicate the price is increasing on low volume: strong negative values indicate the price is dropping on low volume. The moving average of the indicator can be added to act as a trigger line, which is similar to other indicators like the MACD.
Easement In Gross
Easement
An easement is a non-possessory right to use and/or enter onto the real property of another without possessing it. It is "best typified in the right of way which one landowner, A, may enjoy over the land of another, B". It is similar to real covenants and equitable servitudes; in the United States, the Restatement of Property takes steps to merge these concepts as servitudes.
Easy Money
Easy To Borrow List
Eat Well, Sleep Well
Eat Your Own Dog Food
Eating your own dog food, also called dogfooding, is a slang term used to reference a scenario in which a company uses its own product to test and promote the product.
Eating Someone's Lunch
Eating Stock
Echo Bubble
Eclectic Paradigm
The eclectic paradigm is a theory in economics and is also known as the OLI-Model or OLI-Framework. It is a further development of the internalization theory and published by John H. Dunning in 1979.
Eco Communalism
Econometrician
Econometrics is the application of statistical methods to economic data and is described as the branch of economics that aims to give empirical content to economic relations. More precisely, it is "the quantitative analysis of actual economic phenomena based on the concurrent development of theory and observation, related by appropriate methods of inference". An introductory economics textbook describes econometrics as allowing economists "to sift through mountains of data to extract simple relationships". The first known use of the term "econometrics" was by Polish economist Paweł Ciompa in 1910. Ragnar Frisch is credited with coining the term in the sense in which it is used today.
Econometrics
Econometrics is the application of statistical methods to economic data and is described as the branch of economics that aims to give empirical content to economic relations. More precisely, it is "the quantitative analysis of actual economic phenomena based on the concurrent development of theory and observation, related by appropriate methods of inference". An introductory economics textbook describes econometrics as allowing economists "to sift through mountains of data to extract simple relationships". The first known use of the term "econometrics" was by Polish economist Paweł Ciompa in 1910. Ragnar Frisch is credited with coining the term in the sense in which it is used today.
Economic And Social Stabilization Fund (Chile)
Economic Blight
Economic Calendar
An economic calendar is used by investors to monitor market-moving events, such as economic indicators and monetary policy decisions. Market-moving events, which are typically announced or released in a report, have a high probability of impacting the financial markets.
Economic Capital
In finance, mainly for financial services firms, economic capital is the amount of risk capital, assessed on a realistic basis, which a firm requires to cover the risks that it is running or collecting as a going concern, such as market risk, credit risk, legal risk, and operational risk. It is the amount of money which is needed to secure survival in a worst-case scenario. Firms and financial services regulators should then aim to hold risk capital of an amount equal at least to economic capital.
Economic Collapse
There is no precise definition of an economic collapse. The term has been used to describe a broad range of bad economic conditions, ranging from a severe, prolonged depression with high bankruptcy rates and high unemployment, to a breakdown in normal commerce caused by hyperinflation, or even an economically caused sharp rise in the death rate and perhaps even a decline in population.
Economic Conditions
Economic Cycle
The business cycle or economic cycle is the downward and upward movement of gross domestic product around its long-term growth trend. The length of a business cycle is the period of time containing a single boom and contraction in sequence. These fluctuations typically involve shifts over time between periods of relatively rapid economic growth, and periods of relative stagnation or decline.
Economic Depreciation
Economic Derivative
Economic Efficiency
Economic efficiency is, roughly speaking, a situation in which nothing can be improved without something else being hurt. Depending on the context, it is usually one of the following two related concepts...
Economic Equilibrium
In economics, economic equilibrium is a state where economic forces such as supply and demand are balanced and in the absence of external influences the values of economic variables will not change. For example, in the standard textbook model of perfect competition, equilibrium occurs at the point at which quantity demanded and quantity supplied are equal. Market equilibrium in this case refers to a condition where a market price is established through competition such that the amount of goods or services sought by buyers is equal to the amount of goods or services produced by sellers. This price is often called the competitive price or market clearing price and will tend not to change unless demand or supply changes, and the quantity is called "competitive quantity" or market clearing quantity. However, the concept of equilibrium in economics also applies to imperfectly competitive markets, where it takes the form of a Nash equilibrium.
Economic Exposure
Economic Forecasting
Economic forecasting is the process of making predictions about the economy. Forecasts can be carried out at a high level of aggregation—for example for GDP, inflation, unemployment or the fiscal deficit—or at a more disaggregated level, for specific sectors of the economy or even specific firms.
Economic Growth And Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA)
Economic Growth Rate
Economic growth is the increase in the inflation-adjusted market value of the goods and services produced by an economy over time. It is conventionally measured as the percent rate of increase in real gross domestic product, or real GDP, usually in per capita terms.
Economic Growth
Economic growth is the increase in the inflation-adjusted market value of the goods and services produced by an economy over time. It is conventionally measured as the percent rate of increase in real gross domestic product, or real GDP, usually in per capita terms.
Economic Indicator
An economic indicator is a statistic about an economic activity. Economic indicators allow analysis of economic performance and predictions of future performance. One application of economic indicators is the study of business cycles. Economic indicators include various indices, earnings reports, and economic summaries. Examples: unemployment rate, quits rate, housing starts, consumer price index, consumer leverage ratio, industrial production, bankruptcies, gross domestic product, broadband internet penetration, retail sales, stock market prices, money supply changes.
Economic Integration
Economic integration is the unification of economic policies between different states through the partial or full abolition of tariff and non-tariff restrictions on trade taking place among them prior to their integration. This is meant in turn to lead to lower prices for distributors and consumers with the goal of increasing the level of welfare, while leading to an increase of economic productivity of the states.
Economic Life
Economies of Scale
In microeconomics, economies of scale are the cost advantages that enterprises obtain due to size, output, or scale of operation, with cost per unit of output generally decreasing with increasing scale as fixed costs are spread out over more units of output.
Effective Interest Rate (Under Review)
Efficient Market Hypothesis
In financial economics, the efficient-market hypothesis states that asset prices fully reflect all available information. A direct implication is that it is impossible to "beat the market" consistently on a risk-adjusted basis since market prices should only react to new information or changes in discount rates.
Enterprise Value
Enterprise value, total enterprise value, or firm value is an economic measure reflecting the market value of a business. It is a sum of claims by all claimants: creditors and shareholders. Enterprise value is one of the fundamental metrics used in business valuation, financial modeling, accounting, portfolio analysis, and risk analysis.
Equity
Expense Ratio
The expense ratio of a stock or asset fund is the total percentage of fund assets used for administrative, management, advertising, and all other expenses. An expense ratio of 1% per annum means that each year 1% of the fund's total assets will be used to cover expenses. The expense ratio does not include sales loads or brokerage commissions.
Exponential Moving Average
In statistics, a moving average is a calculation to analyze data points by creating series of averages of different subsets of the full data set. It is also called a moving mean or rolling mean and is a type of finite impulse response filter. Variations include: simple, and cumulative, or weighted forms.
e CBOT
eCash
ecash was conceived by David Chaum as an anonymous cryptographic electronic money or electronic cash system in 1983. It was realized through his corporation Digicash and used as micropayment system at one US bank from 1995 to 1998.