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Financial Terms beginning with S

S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats
The Dividend Aristocrats are S&P 500 constituents that have increased their dividend payouts for 25 consecutive years.
S&P 500 Mini
S&P 500 (Under Review)
S&P 600
The S&P SmallCap 600 Index, more commonly known as the S&P 600, is a stock market index from Standard & Poor's. It covers roughly the small-cap range of US stocks, using a capitalization-weighted index. As of January 2015, the market capital of companies included in the S&P SmallCap 600 Index ranged from US$ 400 million to US$ 1.8 billion. These smallcap stocks cover a narrower range of capitalization than the companies covered by the Russell 2000 Smallcap index which range from $169 million to $4 billion. The market valuation for companies in the SmallCap Index and other indices change over times with inflation and the growth of publicly traded companies. The S&P 400 MidCap index combined with the SmallCap 600 compose the S&P 1000, and the S&P 1000 plus the S&P 500 comprise the S&P 1500., the index's median market cap was almost $1.1 billion and covered roughly three percent of the total US stock market. The index was launched on October 28, 1994.
S&P Core Earnings
S&P MidCap 400 Index
S&P Phenomenon
S 3 Filing
S 8 Filing
S and P 500
S
SAFE Investment Company (China)
SAMA Foreign Holdings (Saudi Arabia)
SEC (Under Review)
SMA (Under Review)
Saber Currency
Sacred Cow
Sacrifice Ratio
Safe Asset
Safe Deposit Box
A safe deposit box, sometimes known erroneously as a safety deposit box, is an individually secured container, usually held within a larger safe or bank vault. Safe deposit boxes are generally located in banks, post offices or other institutions. Safe deposit boxes are used to store valuable possessions, such as gemstones, precious metals, currency, marketable securities, important documents, or computer data, that need protection from theft, fire, flood, tampering, or other perils. In the United States, neither banks nor the FDIC insure the contents. An individual should purchase insurance for the safe deposit box in order to cover theft, fire, flooding, terrorist attacks and other natural disasters and catastrophes.
Safe Harbor
Safe Haven
Safekeeping Certificate
Safekeeping
Safety First Rule
Saitori
Salad Oil Scandal
The Salad Oil Scandal, also referred to as the "Soybean Scandal", was a major corporate scandal in 1963 that ultimately caused over $150 million – approximately $1.1 billion in 2008 dollars – in losses to corporations including American Express, Bank of America and Bank Leumi, as well as many international trading companies. The scandal's ability to push otherwise cautious and conservative lenders into increasingly risky practices has prompted some comparisons to recent financial crises including the 2007–2008 subprime mortgage financial crisis.
Salary Freeze
Salary Reduction Contribution
Salary Reduction Simplified Employee Pension Plan (SARSEP)
Sale Of Crown Jewels
Sale and Repurchase Agreement (SRA)
Sale
Sales And Purchase Agreement (SPA)
Sales Charge
Sales Comparison Approach (SCA)
Sales Lead
In marketing, lead generation is the initiation of consumer interest or enquiry into products or services of a business. Leads can be created for purposes such as list building, e-newsletter list acquisition or for sales leads. The methods for generating leads typically fall under the umbrella of advertising, but may also include non-paid sources such as organic search engine results or referrals from existing customers.
Sales Meeting
Sales Mix Variance
Sales Mix
Sales Per Share
Sales Per Square Foot
In retail, sales per unit area is a standard and usually the primary measurement of store success. The unit of area is usually square metres in the metric system or square feet in U.S. customary units. Square feet are also widely used in retailing in the United Kingdom, but there are signs of a trend towards use of square meters.
Sales Price Variance
Sales Tax
A sales tax is a tax paid to a governing body for the sales of certain goods and services. Usually laws allow the seller to collect funds for the tax from the consumer at the point of purchase. When a tax on goods or services is paid to a governing body directly by a consumer, it is usually called a use tax. Often laws provide for the exemption of certain goods or services from sales and use tax.
Sales To Cash Flow Ratio
Sallie Mae (Student Loan Marketing Association)
Salomon Brothers World Equity Index (SBWEI)
Salomon Brothers
Salomon Brothers was a Wall Street investment bank, known as a bulge bracket company. Founded in 1910 by three brothers along with a clerk named Ben Levy, it remained a partnership until the early 1980s, when it was acquired by the commodity trading firm Phibro Corporation and became Salomon Inc. Eventually, Salomon was acquired by Travelers Group in 1998; and, following the latter's merger with Citicorp that same year, Salomon became part of Citigroup. Although the Salomon name carried on as Salomon Smith Barney, which were the investment banking operations of Citigroup, the name was ultimately abandoned in October 2003 after a series of financial scandals that tarnished the bank's reputation.
Salvage Value
Same Day Funds
Same Day Substitution
Same Property Rule
Same Store Sales
Sample Selection Bias
In statistics, sampling bias is a bias in which a sample is collected in such a way that some members of the intended population are less likely to be included than others. It results in a biased sample, a non-random sample of a population in which all individuals, or instances, were not equally likely to have been selected. If this is not accounted for, results can be erroneously attributed to the phenomenon under study rather than to the method of sampling.
Sample
Sampling Distribution
In statistics, a sampling distribution or finite-sample distribution is the probability distribution of a given statistic based on a random sample. Sampling distributions are important in statistics because they provide a major simplification en route to statistical inference. More specifically, they allow analytical considerations to be based on the sampling distribution of a statistic, rather than on the joint probability distribution of all the individual sample values.
Sampling Error
In statistics, sampling error is incurred when the statistical characteristics of a population are estimated from a subset, or sample, of that population. Since the sample does not include all members of the population, statistics on the sample, such as means and quantiles, generally differ from the characteristics of the entire population, which are known as parameters. For example, if one measures the height of a thousand individuals from a country of one million, the average height of the thousand is typically not the same as the average height of all one million people in the country. Since sampling is typically done to determine the characteristics of a whole population, the difference between the sample and population values is considered a sampling error. Exact measurement of sampling error is generally not feasible since the true population values are unknown; however, sampling error can often be estimated by probabilistic modeling of the sample.
Sampling
Samurai Bond
A samurai bond is a yen-denominated bond issued in Tokyo by non-Japanese companies, and is subject to Japanese regulations. These bonds provide the issuer with an access to Japanese capital, which can be used for local investments or for financing operations outside Japan. Foreign borrowers may want to issue in Samurai market to hedge against foreign currency exchange risk. Another intention may be simultaneously exchanging the issue into another currency, in order to take advantage of lower costs. Lower costs may result from investor preferences that differ across segmented markets or from temporary market conditions that differentially affect the swaps and bond markets.
Samurai Market
Sandbag
Sandwich Generation
The Sandwich Generation is a generation of people who care for their aging parents while supporting their own children.
Sandwich Lease
Sanford J. Grossman
Sanford "Sandy" Jay Grossman is an American economist and hedge fund manager specializing in quantitative finance. Grossman's research has spanned the analysis of information in securities markets, corporate structure, property rights, and optimal dynamic risk management. He has published widely in leading economic and business journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Econometrics, Econometrica, and Journal of Finance. His research in macroeconomics, finance, and risk management has earned numerous awards. Grossman is currently Chairman and CEO of QFS Asset Management, an affiliate of which he founded in 1988. QFS Asset Management shut down its sole remaining hedge fund in January 2014.
Sanku (Three Gaps) Pattern
Santa Claus Rally
A Santa Claus rally is a rise in stock prices in the month of December, generally seen over the final week of trading prior to the new year. The rally is generally attributed to anticipation of the January effect, an injection of additional funds into the market, and to additional trades which must, for accounting and tax reasons, be completed by the end of the year. Another reason for the rally may be fund managers "window dressing" their holdings with stocks that have performed well.
Santiago Stock Exchange (SSE) .SN
Sao Paolo Stock Exchange (SAO) .SA
Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002 (SOX)
Satellite Operation
Satisficing
Satisficing is a decision-making strategy or cognitive heuristic that entails searching through the available alternatives until an acceptability threshold is met. The term satisficing, a combination of satisfy and suffice, was introduced by Herbert A. Simon in 1956, although the concept was first posited in his 1947 book Administrative Behavior. Simon used satisficing to explain the behavior of decision makers under circumstances in which an optimal solution cannot be determined. He maintained that many natural problems are characterized by computational intractability or a lack of information, both of which preclude the use of mathematical optimization procedures. Consequently, he observed in his Nobel Prize speech that "decision makers can satisfice either by finding optimum solutions for a simplified world, or by finding satisfactory solutions for a more realistic world.
Saturday Night Special
Saucer
A saucer is a type of small dishware. While in the Middle Ages a saucer was used for serving condiments and sauces, currently the term is used to denote a small plate or shallow bowl that supports a cup – usually one used to serve coffee or tea. The center of the saucer often contains a depression sized to fit a matching cup; this depression is sometimes raised, and antique saucers may omit it altogether. The saucer is useful for protecting surfaces from possible damage due to the heat of a cup, and to catch overflow, splashes, and drips from the cup, thus protecting both table linen and the user sitting in a free-standing chair who holds both cup and saucer. The saucer also provides a convenient place for a damp spoon, as might be used to stir the drink in the cup in order to mix sweeteners or creamers into tea or coffee.
Saver's Tax Credit
Savings Account
A savings account is a deposit account held at a retail bank that pays interest but cannot be used directly as money in the narrow sense of a medium of exchange. These accounts let customers set aside a portion of their liquid assets while earning a monetary return. In some jurisdictions, deposits in savings accounts do not incur reserve requirements.
Savings And Loan Crisis (S&L)
Savings Association Insurance Fund (SAIF)
Savings Bond Plan
Savings Club
Savings Incentive Match Plan For Employees Of Small Employers (SIMPLE)
Savings Rate
Savings
Savings.com, Inc. is an online destination that offers coupons and deals redeemable at nationally recognized merchant web sites and stores. Savings.com sources much of its content from the stores they are affiliated with, members, and their own internal deal hunting team. A dedicated deal team ensures offers are reliable and of high quality. Deals are distributed on-site and through hundreds of influencers in the Savings.com DealPro Network.
Savior Plan
Scarcity Principle
Securities and Exchange Commission SEC
Security (Under Review)
Sharpe Ratio
In finance, the Sharpe ratio is a way to examine the performance of an investment by adjusting for its risk. The ratio measures the excess return per unit of deviation in an investment asset or a trading strategy, typically referred to as risk, named after William F. Sharpe.
Short Position
In finance, short selling is the practice of selling securities or other financial instruments that are not currently owned, and subsequently repurchasing them. In the event of an interim price decline, the short seller will profit, since the cost ofpurchase will be less than the proceeds which were received upon the initial sale. Conversely, the short position will be closed out at a loss in the event that the price of a shorted instrument should rise prior to repurchase. The potential loss on a short sale is theoretically unlimited in the event of an unlimited rise in the price of the instrument, however, in practice, the short seller will be required to post margin or collateral to cover losses, and any inability to do so on a timely basis would cause its broker or counterparty to liquidate the position. In the securities markets, the seller generally must borrow the securities in order to effect delivery in the short sale.
Short Selling
In finance, short selling is the practice of selling securities or other financial instruments that are not currently owned, and subsequently repurchasing them. In the event of an interim price decline, the short seller will profit, since the cost ofpurchase will be less than the proceeds which were received upon the initial sale. Conversely, the short position will be closed out at a loss in the event that the price of a shorted instrument should rise prior to repurchase. The potential loss on a short sale is theoretically unlimited in the event of an unlimited rise in the price of the instrument, however, in practice, the short seller will be required to post margin or collateral to cover losses, and any inability to do so on a timely basis would cause its broker or counterparty to liquidate the position. In the securities markets, the seller generally must borrow the securities in order to effect delivery in the short sale.
Short Squeeze
A short squeeze is a rapid increase in the price of a stock that occurs when there is a lack of supply and an excess of demand for the stock.
Short (Under Review)
Simple Moving Average
In statistics, a moving average is a calculation to analyze data points by creating series of averages of different subsets of the full data set. It is also called a moving mean or rolling mean and is a type of finite impulse response filter. Variations include: simple, and cumulative, or weighted forms.
Small Cap
Socialism
Standard Deviation
Stochastic Oscillator
In technical analysis of securities trading, the stochastic oscillator is a momentum indicator that uses support and resistance levels. Dr. George Lane developed this indicator in the late 1950s. The term stochastic refers to the point of a current price in relation to its price range over a period of time. This method attempts to predict price turning points by comparing the closing price of a security to its price range.
Stock
Stop Loss Order
Supply