This Site Requires Javascript
Burger Menu

Large Cap

Additional Resources

  1. The University Of New Haven Department Of Economics & Finance [newhaven.edu]
  2. Lebow Alums Dominate Large Cap Funds [lebow.drexel.edu]
  3. On The Economic Consequences Of Index-linked Investing [pages.stern.nyu.edu]
  4. Unemployment And Small Cap Returns [econ.yale.edu]
  5. Introduction To Economics [udel.edu]
  6. The Relative Performance Of Small Cap Firms And Default Risk Across ... [craig.csufresno.edu]

Source: Wikipedia
This Article has been Edited for Accessibility

Calculation

Market cap is given by the formula , where MC is the market capitalization, N is the number of shares outstanding, and P is the closing price per share.

For example, if some company has 4 million shares outstanding and the closing price per share is $20, its market cap is then $80 million. If the closing price per share rises to $21, the market cap becomes $84 million. If it drops to $19 per share, the market cap falls to $76 million. This is in contrast to mercantile pricing where purchase price, average price and sale price may differ due to transaction costs.

Market cap terms

Traditionally, companies were divided into large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap. The terms mega-cap and micro-cap have also since come into common use, and nano-cap is sometimes heard. Different numbers are used by different indexes; there is no official definition of, or full consensus agreement about, the exact cutoff values. The cutoffs may be defined as percentiles rather than in nominal dollars. The definitions expressed in nominal dollars need to be adjusted over decades due to inflation, population change, and overall market valuation (for example, $1 billion was a large market cap in 1950, but it is not very large now), and market caps are likely to be different country to country.

Related measures

Market cap reflects only the equity value of a company. It is important to note that a firm's choice of capital structure has a significant impact on how the total value of a company is allocated between equity and debt. A more comprehensive measure is enterprise value (EV), which gives effect to outstanding debt, preferred stock, and other factors. For insurance firms, a value called the embedded value (EV) has been used.

WCAG 2.0

Section 508