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S&P 600

Definition

The S&P SmallCap 600 Index, more commonly known as the S&P 600, is a stock market index from Standard & Poor's. It covers roughly the small-cap range of US stocks, using a capitalization-weighted index. As of January 2015, the market capital of companies included in the S&P SmallCap 600 Index ranged from US$ 400 million to US$ 1.8 billion. These smallcap stocks cover a narrower range of capitalization than the companies covered by the Russell 2000 Smallcap index which range from $169 million to $4 billion. The market valuation for companies in the SmallCap Index and other indices change over times with inflation and the growth of publicly traded companies. The S&P 400 MidCap index combined with the SmallCap 600 compose the S&P 1000, and the S&P 1000 plus the S&P 500 comprise the S&P 1500., the index's median market cap was almost $1.1 billion and covered roughly three percent of the total US stock market. The index was launched on October 28, 1994.

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Last Sourced: 2017-08-01
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S&P 600

The S&P SmallCap 600 Index, more commonly known as the S&P 600, is a stock market index from Standard & Poor's. It covers roughly the small-cap range of US stocks, using a capitalization-weighted index. As of 31 January 2017 , the market capital of companies included in the S&P SmallCap 600 Index ranged from US$ 400 million to US$ 1.8 billion. The index's median market cap was almost $1.1 billion and covered roughly three percent of the total US stock market. These smallcap stocks cover a narrower range of capitalization than the companies covered by the Russell 2000 Smallcap index which range from $169 million to $4 billion. The market valuation for companies in the SmallCap Index and other indices change over times with inflation and the growth of publicly traded companies. The S&P 400 MidCap index combined with the SmallCap 600 compose the S&P 1000, and the S&P 1000 plus the S&P 500 comprise the S&P 1500. The index was launched on October 28, 1994.

Investing

The following exchange-traded funds (ETFs) attempt to track the performance of the index:

It can be compared to the Russell 2000 Index.

Versions

The "S&P 600" generally quoted is a price return index; there is also "total return" version of the index. These versions differ in how dividends are accounted for. The price return version does not account for dividends; it only captures the changes in the prices of the index components. The total return version reflects the effects of dividend reinvestment.


Additional Resources

  1. Data [kellogg.northwestern.edu]
  2. Executive Compensation [laef.ucsb.edu]
  3. On The Economic Consequences Of Index-linked Investing [pages.stern.nyu.edu]
  4. Performance Evaluation And Self-designated Benchmark Indexes In ... [fisher.osu.edu]
  5. William Lazonick [brookings.edu]
  6. Structural Volatility In Argentina: A Policy Report [economics.mit.edu]